2016 Technology Matching Fund

The City of Seattle is now accepting applications for collaborative technology projects up to $50,000. City dollars are matched by the community’s contribution of volunteer labor, materials, professional services, or cash.  Get the 2016 guidelines and apply here: http://seattle.gov/tech/tmf.

The Technology Matching Fund provides funds for digital equity projects. The goals of the fund are to:

  • Increase access to free or low-cost broadband;
  • Empower residents with digital literacy skills; and
  • Ensure affordable, available and sufficient devices and technical support.

Deadline: May 4 at 5:00 p.m. 

GiveBIG on May 3

Over the past five years, more than $56 million was invested in the Greater Seattle Community through GiveBIG.  A one-day online charitable giving event, GiveBIG is designed to raise money for our region’s hard-working nonprofits.  Visit the GiveBIG website, https://givebig.seattlefoundation.org/, to register your non-profit, find resources and FAQs, see the sponsored calendar of events and ways to boost giving.

Large Projects Fund – Department of Neighborhoods

The Large Projects Fund (LPF) provides awards up to $100,000 to support community members in building community relationships around a project. Large Projects Fund activities may be physical projects as well as less tangible but equally significant educational, cultural, and relationship-strengthening activities. All projects must demonstrate its capacity to build a stronger and healthier community, and must:

  • Provide a public benefit and be free and open to all members of the public.
  • Emphasize self-help, with project ideas initiated, planned and implemented by the neighbors and community members who will themselves be impacted by the project.
  • Demonstrate community match.
  • Occur within the Seattle city limits.

Application Workshops: Attendance at one of the following workshops is mandatory prior to application. 

  • March 24, 6:00 pm, at Bitter Lake Community Center, 13035 Linden Ave N, Seattle, 98133

Due date: May 2, 2015

 

SCSS upgrades lab with Tech Matching Fund

Somali
Kudos to 23 community organizations who successfully completed Technology Matching Fund projects in 2015.  These projects achieved greater digital inclusion for over 4,100 residents in Seattle left behind by the digital divide.

One grantee, Somali Community Services of Seattle (SCSS), received a $9,000 award to upgrade their aging computer lab.   Computers almost a decade old made way for eleven new desktop computers.  The lab has since been used weekly to teach more than 215 youth, adults and seniors a variety of technology skills.  Classes are typically held twice a week for one hour by instructors versed in office computer skills.

Senior immigrants have especially benefited from these classes, because many had not been exposed to computers prior to arriving in the United States. The skills they learned in computer classes helped them write emails and letters to families and friends abroad. Some seniors even expressed a desire to teach these skills to youth as they learn and grow.   Somali businessmen and businesswomen also used the lab for crucial business tasks like creating budgets and flyers.

Executive Director Sahra Farah emphasized the value of City support for community-based organizations like hers.  “These funds help us fulfill our mission of assisting Somali refugee families and community members to achieve self-sustainable status in the communities they live in.  Because computer skills are such vital skills to have in the 21st century, these resources are irreplaceable in helping Somali community members stay relevant, and productive.”

Small Sparks Fund

The Department of Neighborhood’s Small Sparks Fund provides awards of up to $1,000 to support community members in becoming civically engaged. Projects can include neighborhood organizing, membership expansion or numerous other types of activities.  All projects must demonstrate the capacity to build a stronger and healthier community, and must:

  • Provide a public benefit and be free and open to all members of the public.
  • Emphasize self-help, with project ideas initiated, planned and implemented by the neighbors and community members who will themselves be impacted by the project.
  • Demonstrate community match.
  • Occur within the Seattle city limits.

Deadline: None.

Kessler Foundation invites applications for Signature Employment Grants

The Kessler Foundation is dedicated to improving the quality of life for people with disabilities through discovery, innovation, demonstration, application, and dissemination.

To that end, the foundation is inviting Concept Applications from nonprofit organizations for its annual Signature Employment grants program, which supports new pilot initiatives, demonstration projects, or social ventures that lead to the generation of new ideas aimed at solving the unemployment and underemployment of individuals with disabilities.

Grants of up to $500,000 over two years will be awarded to qualified pilot projects. Signature grants are not intended to fund project expansions or bring proven projects to new communities.

All interested candidates must submit an online concept application no later than March 18, 2016. Upon review, select candidates will be invited to submit a full proposal by July 1, 2016.

Any organization recognized as a tax-exempt entity under the Internal Revenue Code may apply. This includes nonprofit agencies, public or private schools, and public institutions such as universities and government agencies (state, local, federal) based in the United States or any of its territories.

Link to complete RFP

Deadline: March 18, 2016 (Concept Papers)

National Award for Technology Matching Fund Grants

digitalinclustion2Seattle’s Community Technology Program has been honored by The National League of Cities, Next Century Cities, and Google Fiber with one of their inaugural Digital Inclusion Leadership awards.

The award recognizes the City’s Technology Matching Fund grant program as a leading best practice in fostering digital inclusion. Winners were chosen on the basis of a program’s ability to provide training, access, and hardware to a diverse range of participants, at low cost, with proven results and community engagement. The awards were established to celebrate the cities that are leading programs or empowering community-based organizations to tackle barriers to Internet adoption, and to encourage leaders in the public sector to get involved in digital inclusion by sharing best practices.

Over the past 18 years, the Technology Matching Fund program has enabled 153 community organizations to build their capacity to provide technology and internet access, digital skills training, and electronic civic engagement. The majority of City funding for the program has been allocated from cable franchise fees, and has reinvested over $3.9 million in community based projects. The City’s 2015 Technology Matching Fund projects, selected in July 2015, will collectively receive $470,000, enabling increased digital equity for more than 14,900 residents. Fund recipients are recommended by the City’s Community Technology Advisory Board and approved by the Mayor and City Council. The program has served as a model for other cities.

“This program is part of our ongoing commitment to ensure all Seattle residents can participate in our increasingly digital society,” said Michael Mattmiller, City of Seattle Chief Technology Officer. “This award is the result of strong commitment and partnerships for digital equity between our community organizations, Mayor Ed Murray, City Council, Community Technology Advisory Board, Department of Information Technology and the many volunteers and supporters working to help bring digital inclusion to all residents.”

The award was presented to the City of Seattle’s Department of Information Technology’s Community Technology Program on Thursday, November 5, at the National League of Cities’ Congress of Cities event in Nashville, Tennessee.

For more information on the Technology Matching Fund and the Community Technology Program in the Department of Information Technology, visit http://www.seattle.gov/tech/TMF.

Grant proposal writing resource

Foundation Center has put together a Proposal Writing Short Course available for free on their web site.  Here you can learn how to address the various parts to writing a successful grant proposal, from gathering background information, executive summaries, statements of needs, project description, budget and more.  As you move through the short course, you can take breaks by looking at the other sections of their web site, including finding funders, viewing events and gaining knowledge.

Neighborhood Matching Fund Small Sparks Fund

Neighborhood Matching Fund Small Sparks Fund: Provides funds of up to $1000 to support community members in becoming civically engaged. Projects must demonstrate a capacity to build a stronger and healthier community and:

  • Provide a public benefit and be free and open to the public;
  • Emphasize self-help, with project ideas initiated, planned and implemented by the community;
  • Demonstrate a community match of volunteer labor, donated professional services or materials, and/or cash.

Due: Ongoing